Monthly News Article for June 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Written by the TCOE Team

With all of the hardships COVID-19 has caused, we want to take a moment to acknowledge how well the school districts in Trinity County have changed and adapted to a new way of serving students. It’s been difficult for everyone, but we are ending the school year strong and are proud of the way all of our districts have risen to the challenge to serve our students and communities.

As of this writing, districts in Trinity County have served nearly 100,000 meals to students since schools were closed. They have fed all children in their community, whether or not they are students of their districts. Some districts have delivered meals to children if they had buses or vans to utilize, others have offered “drive through” or “drive up” services. Sometimes the meals were a large box of items to last for several days. Sometimes the meals included toilet paper, hand sanitizer, toothbrushes and other treats. Meal distribution time has always included a chance for staff and students to connect, if only to wave at each other.

Schools have continued instruction for every child each day. The delivery of instruction varied to suit the needs of individual students, classes and communities. Sometimes teachers sent home carefully selected and organized packets of work that were completed and returned; sometimes teachers utilized up-to-date and innovative tools like “Google Classroom” and “Zoom” for meetings with students, and for delivering and collecting assignments online.

With the support of teachers and parents, students have participated in the very first, online art show featuring 207 pieces of art in a student-created presentation for the whole community to enjoy. Students also have had the opportunity to participate in creating projects for the online Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math “STEAM” Fair.  Those project are now available to view online.  

In coordination with Trinity Together, students also had opportunities to attend Career Conversations online and interact with Trinity County alumni in discussions about a wide variety of careers and professional experience ranging from independent entrepreneurs to educators, artists, natural resource professionals and corporate leaders.  

Students with disabilities have also been transitioning to a new way of learning. This includes online resources and lessons for speech therapy, occupational therapy, and mental health needs. Additionally, special education teachers have been working virtually with their general education partners, as well as meeting with one another to collaborate and make distance learning appropriate for students with disabilities. The TCOE special education department has also expanded its resources to include video lessons that parents can watch anytime, as a way to make learning flexible.  For families that don’t have reliable internet access, the same information has been printed out in hard copy form and phone calls have been set up to do regular check-ins. Special education staff have transitioned to distance learning in a way that works for parents, providing multiple options and ways of communication. 

The entire education community of Trinity County has worked hard, learned new ways to serve students, and look forward to seeing everyone in person as soon as it’s safe to do so.

Monthly News Article for May 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Submitted by Steve Hiscock, RISE Academy Teacher with Fabio Robles


Parenting during this time of distance learning can be challenging. There can be lots of obstacles that families may experience. These obstacles might include: homes that are not set up for schooling, students struggling with specific subjects, parents who may not be confident with the material students are working on, and having children in different age groups and grades trying to coordinate their schedules, or the use of a computer. The list goes on and on...  

Trinity County Office of Education is hosting a virtual parenting support class to help parents with the many challenges they may now be facing.  Once a week for an hour, parents participate in a webinar where they can pick up helpful and easy to use tips. Additionally, parents have the opportunity to network and share with others what is working or not working in their own homes which allows parents to learn from one another. As a virtual community, we can all help each other get through this.

Three easy tips for distance learning include: knowing your child, creating a schedule and including passion projects. Knowing your child is the foundation of success because each child is unique.  Their strengths, struggles, and personality are going to play a huge role in their success with distance learning.  Some children will excel because they have the self-motivation to push through challenges with learning. Other children may struggle without their classroom teacher beside them to lean on.  Understanding those unique characteristics of your child will help you set them up for success.  A daily schedule allows each child the benefit of predicting what is happening throughout the day.  This predictability gives them something to look forward to during times that are difficult.  Just waking up in the morning without a plan is going to be a recipe for disaster. Routines and predictability have been shown to lesson anxiety and increase motivation and success in children. Passion projects are another way to increase success by engaging children's interest and strengths.  These projects are what students look forward to the most.  If a child is passionate about auto mechanics, art, robotics, pets, or pottery; have them research, explore, write, and do hands-on activities in those areas and, when possible, have them relate their interests to the work they are being asked to complete.  Whenever possible, parent participation is a great way to increase and build a positive relationship. Sometimes just being available to listen to your child for a few undivided minutes can make all the difference.  The best learning takes place with children who love what they are learning and can apply it to their interests.  

If you find these ideas helpful and would like to be a part of this virtual community, please join us every Tuesday at 5:30 PM.  You can register by going to the online link at https://bit.ly/parentingsupports or on the Trinity County Office of Education Facebook Page. Be sure to email us there if you have any questions or need any help with the registration at shiscock [AT] trinitycoe [DOT] org. We look forward to talking more! 

Monthly News Article for April 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Offering Support during COVID-19

Over the past month, many of our daily routines have been changed and we are in the process of adjusting to a new way of doing things. While we are all navigating this current situation together, it can be difficult to know what to do next or how to support our kids. In this article, we hope to offer some ideas and things to consider as we move forward with distance learning and social distancing. 

Be an Example 

Kids will respond to a situation based on how they see adults around them respond. This means that we need to try and keep things honest. While the Coronavirus is significant, remind your kids that your family is healthy and that you are doing everything you can to keep them safe. Listen to their concerns and try to help them through those fears by staying positive. Remind them of the positives that have come from the current situation (like spending more time together as a family).

 

Create a Daily Routine 

We are all used to routines in our daily lives. While schools are physically closed, learning continues during this time, and it is important that we provide stability through distance learning. This can be done by maintaining a regular schedule at home (waking up, eating, learning, connecting with friends virtually, bedtime, etc.). Try to let your kids maintain their regular school day and the things they would normally do within the guidelines of social distancing. Keeping a regular schedule provides a sense of control, predictability, and calm in a time where kids (and adults) feel like they may not have much control.

Talk to your Kids!

Don’t be afraid to talk to your kids about the Coronavirus. It is important to answer their questions truthfully, but don't offer unnecessary details. Kids do not normally talk about their concerns because they are confused or don't want to worry loved ones. Kids feel empowered if they can control some aspects of their life, which in turn, reduces fear. Some talking tips include: 

  • For elementary kids, provide brief, simple information that balances fact with reassurance that adults are there to help kids stay healthy and to take care of them if they do get sick. Give simple examples of the steps people make every day to stop germs and stay healthy (like hand washing). 
  • Middle school kids, are often more vocal in asking questions about whether they are safe and what will happen in their community. Middle schoolers will need assistance separating reality from rumor (do this with facts to help ease any fear). 
  • High school students, can have more in-depth discussions. Provide them with honest and accurate information about the current status of the coronavirus. Talk to them and include them in decision-making about home schedules, chores, and helping other family members in the home. 

We hope these tips will help you and your family through these challenging times. It is important that we talk about what is occurring, either in person (in our own homes) or through social media. 

Monthly News Article for March 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

The R.I.S.E. of a Trauma-Informed School in Trinity County

Trauma-related experiences occur across all racial, economic, and cultural groups yet the way these experiences show up in school, and the way they are responded to, vary greatly. In a national survey of 95,677 children (eighteen years old and younger) from all economic levels and ethnic backgrounds, 46 percent experienced at least one “adverse childhood experience” also referred to as “ACE”. National databases suggest that 26 percent of children in the United States will witness or experience a traumatic event before the age of four. Trauma can occur from a natural disaster, abuse, neglect, or from experiencing or witnessing violence, among other things.

A child's brain can actually change as a result of traumatic stress. These changes can harm children's ability to be attentive in school, to express their emotions in appropriate ways, to trust adults, and to form positive relationships with teachers and other students. However, with the right support, students can heal from trauma. With the right training, teachers can work with children in ways that help them move beyond past traumas so that they can be successful in school. A trauma-sensitive approach begins with recognizing that many students enter our school system with behaviors that can prevent them from learning. In a trauma-informed school, educators use specific “trauma-informed” strategies that help students feel safe and cared for, and are focused on the individual needs of each student. The idea is not, “What’s wrong with that student”; instead school staff are trained to embrace the idea that something traumatic happened to that student.

The Trinity County Office of Education’s R.I.S.E. Academy (Restoring Individual Success in Education) is a trauma-informed school - and was named by its own students - which supports each student’s individual needs and their health and well-being, including those who have experienced trauma. It is led by a school principal/teacher who has been highly trained in trauma-informed practices, Mr. Steve Hiscock. Hiscock and his staff have developed a culture of caring and support for each student, with individualized learning focused on the social and emotional needs of each student. At R.I.S.E. Academy, all aspects of the educational environment, from academics, to workforce training, to engagement with students and families, to procedures and policies, are grounded in an understanding of trauma and its impact, and are designed to promote resilience and healing of trauma for all students who attend. R.I.S.E. was created just two years ago based on the recognized needs in our county.

Students can be recommended to attend R.I.S.E. Academy through their own district, through Trinity County Probation, and in some instances, through their parents/guardians. R.I.S.E. student numbers are kept to a minimum which is appropriate for the type of school. The school is not for everyone, however, so there is a rigorous process to determine if the school is a good fit for each student who has been recommended. All nine districts in the county can recommend a student to attend R.I.S.E.. All Students who attend have the ultimate goal of returning to their original school with new coping skills and learning strategies. 

Monthly News Article for February 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

How do we prevent a school shooting in Trinity County?

According to a recent report from the US Secret Service in which they reviewed multiple school shootings, there are things that many attackers had in common. The first is that most attackers used firearms, and those firearms were most often acquired from their home or from the home of a relative. In fact, between 70 and 90% of guns used in youth suicide, unintentional shootings and school shootings are acquired from the home or the homes of friends or relatives.

Read more: Monthly News Article for February 2020

Monthly News Article for January 2020

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

While recognizing that suspension or expulsion of students is sometimes necessary, many groups, including educational leaders, are united in the belief that classroom time should be used for student learning and that school discipline should be imposed in a way that does not exclude students from school or limit their opportunity to learn. The reason for this is that studies have shown a relationship between suspending kids from school and serious educational, economic, and social problems, including decreased achievement, increased behavior problems, and increased likelihood of dropping out, use of substance abuse, and involvement with the juvenile justice system. According to Education Code §48900.5 “Suspension… shall be imposed only when other means of correction fail to bring about proper conduct”. 

Suspensions are simply not effective at changing student behavior. 

Read more: Monthly News Article for January 2020

Monthly News Article for December 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

I hate my teacher!

Most of us can look back and remember having quite a few teachers who were fair…and some who were not-so-fair. Each one of them taught us something extremely important about life. The fair ones gave us a sense that life is sometimes fair. The unfair ones gave us wonderful opportunities to develop skills for coping with those times when it isn't. kids need to learn how to succeed with nice teachers as well as demanding ones.

Read more: Monthly News Article for December 2019

Monthly News Article for November 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Title: Help Shape Our Future – Be Counted!

Every 10 years, the U.S. government counts every person living in the U.S. through the census. The census is a short questionnaire that asks basic information about your household and the
people who live in it. Your responses are confidential. The Census Bureau is not allowed to share your individual information with other government agencies, immigration officials, or the public. Strong laws protect your responses from being shared.

Read more: Monthly News Article for November 2019

Monthly News Article for October 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Title: What is the right amount of parent involvement in a child’s schooling?

There are few things that create more guilt, fear and feelings of failure for parents than seeing our children do badly in school.

Healthy parent involvement means being aware of your kids’ assignments, asking questions about these assignments, and helping them if they ask. It means giving ideas and allowing them to do the lion’s share of the work.

Read more: Monthly News Article for October 2019 

Monthly News Article for September 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

How to Prevent Bullying in Schools

While some may prefer punishing students who bully, and others think that just improving school climate is the answer, a recent survey finds another factor that may help curb bullying: A sense of belonging. 

"The more a child feels like they can connect with their family, their peers, and their school, the less likely they are to engage in bullying behavior," said Christopher Slaten, co-investigator for the survey and professor for the University of Missouri's College of Education.

Read more: Monthly News Article for September 2019

Monthly News Article for August 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

An Outline of the Schools and Districts in Trinity County

You might be surprised to learn that there are nine public school DISTRICTS in Trinity County. A district is defined as an independent school or a collection of schools who are governed by their own School Board and have a Superintendent who manages the district (whereas a Principal is the administrator of just one school in a district).

Read more: Monthly News Article for August 2019

Monthly News Article for June 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Interdistrict Agreements and what it means to live in one district but attend school in another.

As our schools wrap up one school year and prepare for the next, we wanted to take a moment to explain interdistrict agreements and what it means to live in one district but attend school in another. We hope to give you an overview of some of the basic rules and steps involved in navigating this process.

Read more: Monthly News Article for June 2019

Monthly News Article for July 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

How and why are schools finding mold?

Back in the Winter of 2016, Mountain Valley Unified School District in Hayfork was planning to use special funding (Proposition 39 Clean Energy Jobs Act) to replace old Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) units which had failed in the high school cafeteria. When contractors looked into the old HVAC system, they found mold in ducting and so they were not able to continue work until it was removed. During the Spring of 2017, Burnt Ranch School District wanted to build an additional classroom, and while inspecting to see where the room could be added, mold was discovered in the ceiling. In June of 2019, the presence of mold was reported in a cafeteria at Trinity Alps Unified School District and an inspection was ordered. All of these facilities were built in the 1950s-1960s when building technology was not what it is today.

Read more: Monthly News Article for July 2019

Monthly News Article for May 2019

logo


Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

Trinity County Students Attend the 2019 Youth Empowerment Summit

This was the eighth year that a team of Foster youth and Homeless youth from Trinity County have participated in the annual Youth Empowerment Summit (YES) in Sacramento. The Summit is a hands-on approach for students to learn to become positive change leaders in their communities and leaders on youth issues. They learn about the process of government by understanding how upcoming legislative bills will beneficially impact California’s most vulnerable youth, and they learn how to advocate for the bills being submitted for consideration.

Read more: Monthly News Article for May 2019

Trinity County Office of Ed | 201 Memorial Drive | PO Box 1256 |  Phone (530) 623-2861 | FAX (530) 623-4489

Copyright © 2013. All Rights Reserved.